Tag: Health

Environmental Impacts of Pest Prevention Strategies

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The increased amount and recurrence of chemical-based pesticides have presented a noteworthy challenge to the potential creepy crawlies making them either scatter to new living conditions. The adaptation of such creepy crawlies to the new living condition could be ascribed to the few components, for example, mutation, change in their growth rates, an increase in the number of generations. This has at last brought about expanded occurrence of rest appearance and resurgence of bug species that are impervious to pesticides.

Preferably a pesticide ought to be lethal for the targeted pests, yet not to non-target species, including human beings and pets. Alas, this is not the situation, so the debate of usage and misuse of pesticides has raised. The uncontrolled use of these synthetics, under the aphorism, “if little is great, much more will be better” has played ruin with human and other living organisms.

But you need to keep in mind that every class of the pesticides come with a set of environmental issues. Such effects have caused the pesticides to be banned, while their regulation and use has been limited. On the other hand, with technology on the rise, many advancements have been made in the pesticides sector too. Most of them are now generally more species-specific and less persistent, which eventually means that there would be a lower environmental footprint.

Below are discussed some of the negative and positive impacts on the environment because of pest removal services. Keep reading till the end to learn more about their impacts on targeted, non-targeted organisms and the environment itself.

Impact on Humans

Pesticides can enter the body while we inhale aerosol products, residue, and vapor that contain pesticides; through excess oral exposure by eating food or drinking water and even through the skin which is in direct contact with sunlight. Pesticides discharge into soils which can finish up in drinking water.

Kids are highly susceptible to pesticides since they are as yet developing and have a more fragile invulnerable immune system than grown-ups. Kids might be increasingly exposed because of their closer nearness to the ground and habit to put objects in their mouth. Hand to mouth contact relies upon the kid’s age, much like exposure to lead.

Pesticides often get tracked into the home from relatives increases the danger. Poisonous residue in food material may give to a child exposure. The synthetic substances can bio-mass in the body after some time.

Impact on Aquatic Life

Fish and other sea creatures might be harmed by contaminated water by pesticides. Pesticide overflow into streams and rivers can be exceptionally deadly to marine life, here and there murdering all the fish in the stream.

The usage of herbicides to rivers and streams can cause fish kills when the dead plants rot and expend the water’s oxygen, choking out the fish. Herbicides, for example, a copper sulfite that is connected to water to kill plants are poisonous to underwater creatures.

Rehashed exposure to sub-lethal parts of a few types of the pesticides can cause behavioral and physiological changes that reduce the fish population, for example, deserting of their nests and broods, diminished resistance to malady and diminished predator shirking

The quicker a given pesticide separates in nature, the less danger it postures to amphibian life. Bug sprays are ordinarily more harmful to amphibian life than herbicides and fungicides

Impact on Animals

Most species of the living creatures including the humans are harmed by pesticides, which has eventually led to numerous nations to control pesticide use through Biodiversity Action Plans.

Living organisms such as animals and humans might be harmed by pesticide development that remains on food, for instance when wild creatures enter spray fields or close-by territories soon after showering.

Pesticides can dispense with a few creatures’ basic food sources, making the creatures migrate from one place to another in the search of food, change their eating regimen or they might starve to death. The pesticide residue can go up the natural way of life; for instance, birds can be hurt when they eat bugs and worms that have expended pesticides.

Did you know that earthworms digest organic materials and increase nutrient content in the top layer of soil? They ought to secure human safety by ingesting disintegrating litter and filling in as bio-indicators of soil. Pesticides have affected the development and generation of worms. A few pesticides can bio-accumulate, or develop to dangerous dimensions in the collections of living beings that devour them after some time, a wonder that impacts animal groups high on the natural way of life particularly hard.

Conclusion

Numerous options are accessible to reduce the environmental impacts of pest prevention. Choices incorporate manual expulsion, applying heat, covering weeds with plastic, putting traps and baits, evacuating pest breeding. In the case of raccoons, wasp, termites, or mice control, always opt to hire professionals. Undertaking such ventures with little or no experience can harm you.

Pesticides – Impact on Health and Environment

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Do you know that worldwide pesticides consumption is around 2 million tonnes per year? That’s huge. Moreover, the global expenditure on pesticide at producer level are nearly $56 billion, of which 14% of the expenditure is taken by insecticides.

Pesticides have become an integral part of modern life and widely used to prevent the growth of unwanted living organisms. Due to the increasing population, the amount of food produced is important but there are other organisms that are striving to consume the crops meant for humans. When this happens, it results in huge economic losses.

 

Due to this huge loss in food production, pesticides are often used to prevent the pests. This results in so much money spent on pesticides. The benefits of pesticides can be categorised into two types – primary and secondary.

Primary Benefits

  • Controlling pests and plant disease: This includes controlling invasive species and improved crop quality and reduced soil disturbances.
  • Preventing organisms that harm human activities and structures: Pesticides products like Suspended SC help us prevent organisms that attack or destroy properties such as termites, cockroaches Infestation, etc.

Secondary Benefits

  • Community Benefits: Benefits like nutrition and health improvements, food safety and reduced maintenance costs.
  • Global Benefits: Less pressure on uncropped land and international tourism revenue.

Risks

  • Toxic to humans.
  • Negative impacts on ecosystem and environment

Pesticides are meant for harming only the targetted pest, but when used incorrectly it could harm people and environment. Here are the studies on the potential health effects of pesticides.

Lack of Regulations

Poisoning by pesticides is a global public health problem. This poisoning is more serious in the developing countries despite the fact that pesticides are sold in large quantities in the developed countries. One of the reasons for this is the lack of pesticide control laws and training programmes for pesticide users and inspectors in the developing world. Studies shows that around 25% of developing countries lacks rules and laws regulating pesticide use and its distribution.

Pesticides Regulations

In most countries, pesticides are regulated when it is approved for sale and should be used by Government Agency. During the registration process, the pesticides are given labels which mention the safety and hazard warning along with its usage. It also undergoes measurement of acute toxicity test and then classified into one of the toxic classes. Almost all deadly categorised pesticides and insecticides with severe health hazards are banned in most countries. The ban is imposed on pesticides which shows risk at very low level of exposures.

Environmental impact of pesticides

The environmental impacts of pesticides are either direct or indirect damage they cause to plants, animals and microorganisms and varies from minor injuries to death.

Environmental impacts can be categorised into two parts:

  • Damage to animals (Vertebrates & Invertebrates) & plants.
  • Pest resistance to pesticides

Pesticides use has two main unintentional effects on vertebrate wildlife by feeding on the contaminate plants and prey or exposure to high doses and poorer survival, growth and reproduction.

Apart from pesticides impacts on the environment, pesticides help farmers to combat pests and produce larger quantities of food. Farmers also able to earn more profit by having to sell more. Pesticides help farmers save money on labour costs as well.

Malaria, a deadly disease caused by infected Mosquitoes and others like bubonic plague and fleas transmitted by Rats and flea or body lice is reduced due to the usage of pesticides in agriculture sectors, as discussed in the research studies.

An Entomology, Matan Shelomi a published writer on Quora says in his answers that you’re ingesting pesticides and it is no problem at all and he explains it why is it not a problem. He explained that not all pesticides are toxic at all and said many pesticides degrade over time, by the time food reaches you there will be no traces of pesticides in it.

Many edible parts of the food are not sprayed with pesticides. He mentioned that what is deadly to plants and insects is not deadly for mammals and vice versa. Remember again that organic farmers use pesticides and sometimes much more than necessary.

Many NGOs and residents are against pesticides. Some are against due to the lack of knowledge or they believe that we are being exposed to many pesticides and government is literally helping it in the causes.

It is also encouraged by some organic food companies that conventional food companies are using a lot of pesticides and making wrong impacts on people and creating issues of using pesticides which don’t even have an impact on the people eating that food. Pesticides cause health problem to the people working in the field, like farmers, and even people living nearby.

Tips to Make Your Coffee Tastier Without Sugar

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Raise your hands: Do you love coffee? A whole lot of people do. They either drink it first thing when they wake up to get their day going, or they sip cups of joe throughout the day (maybe because they like it, maybe because they need a little energy boost). But to all the naysayers who say coffee isn’t good for you, tell them that research shows otherwise. In fact, coffee may benefit the liver and gall bladder, and it is full of antioxidants.

But what can make coffee unhealthy are the sugary additives that many of us also favor. Sugar can add calories and lead to a host of health conditions such as diabetes and liver disease. If you find plain coffee boring, then perhaps you might want to consider some flavor additions that aren’t sugar focused. What are those? This graphic offers some ideas to start to sip with your coffee.

 

8 Ways to Make Your Coffee Tastier Without Sugar
“8 Ways to Make Your Coffee Tastier Without Sugar” on Health Perch

Menace of Used Lead Acid Batteries

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Lead-acid batteries are used on a mass-scale in all parts of the world. Lead-acid batteries contain sulphuric acid and large amounts of lead. The acid is extremely corrosive and is also a good carrier for soluble lead and lead particulate. Lead is a highly toxic metal that produces a range of adverse health effects particularly in young children.

Recycling of Used Lead-Acid Batteries (ULABs) is a profitable business in developing countries. Many developing countries buy ULABs from industrialized countries (and Middle East) in bulk in order to extract lead. ULAB recycling occurs in almost every city in the developing world where ULAB recycling and smelting operations are often located in densely populated urban areas with hardly any pollution control and safety measures for workers.

Usually ULAB recycling operations release lead-contaminated waste into the environment and natural ecosystems.  More than 12 million people are affected by lead contamination from processing of Used Lead Acid Batteries in the developing world, with South America, South Asia and Africa being the most affected regions.

The problems associated with recycling of ULABs are well-documented and recognized by the industry and the Basel Convention Secretariat. As much of the informal ULAB recycling is small-scale and difficult to regulate or control, progress is possible only through cleanup, outreach, policy, and education.

For example, Blacksmith’s Lead Poisoning and Car Batteries Project is currently active in eight countries, including Senegal, the Dominican Republic, India, and the Philippines. The Project aims to end widespread lead poisoning from the improper recycling of ULABs, and consists of several different strategies and programs, with the most important priority being the health of children in the surrounding communities.

It is essential to stop the export of used lead-acid batteries to developing countries.

There is no effective means of tracking shipments of used lead-acid batteries from foreign exporters to recycling plants in developing world which makes it difficult to trace ULABs going to unauthorized or inadequate facilities.

An effective method to reduce the hazards posed by trans-boundary movements of ULABs is to encourage companies that generate used lead batteries to voluntarily stop exporting lead batteries to developing countries. These types of voluntary restrictions on transboundary shipments can help pressure companies involved in recycling lead batteries in developing to improve their environmental performance. It may also help encourage policy makers to close the gaps in both regulations and enforcement capacity.

For more information, please email Salman Zafar on salman@cleantechloops.com or salman@ecomena.org

Open Burning of Tyres: Impacts on Public Health

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Burning of tyres as a cheap source of energy is common in many developing countries, such as India.  While burning tyres does provide a cheap and efficient source of energy, the harmful effects of such burning far exceed the benefits.

Emissions from open tyre burning include “criteria” pollutants, such as particulates, carbon monoxide (CO), sulfur oxides (SOx), oxides of nitrogen (NOx), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). They also include “non-criteria” hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), such as polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, dioxins, furans, hydrogen chloride, benzene, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs); and metals such as cadmium, nickel, zinc, mercury, chromium, and vanadium.

Both criteria and non-criteria pollutants can cause significant short and long term health effects.  Depending on the length and degree of exposure, these health effects could include irritation of the skin, eyes, and mucous membranes, respiratory effects, central nervous system depression, anxiety and cancer.  Dioxin is a highly toxic compound which may cause cancer and neurological damage, and disrupt reproductive systems, thyroid systems, respiratory systems etc.

Uncontrolled tyre burning has been proven to be 16 times more mutagenic, i.e capable of inducing genetic mutation, than traditional residential wood combustion in a fireplace, and 13,000 times more mutagenic than coal-fired utility emissions with good combustion efficiency and add-on controls.

Uncontrolled tyre burning is highly dangerous for public health and environment

Especially troubling is the exposure that children living within these communities are inadvertently being subjected to. Children, foetuses, nursing babies, elderly, asthmatics, and immune suppressed individuals are all much more vulnerable to the pollutants released burning tyres. Even a nursing woman can transfer the pollutions she inhales to a baby through the fat in her breast milk.  During breast-feeding, infants are exposed to higher concentrations of organic pollutants than at any subsequent time in their lives.

Saving money on fuel by burning tyres should not take precedence over public health. Unfortunately, in small villages and other underdeveloped areas where tyre burning kilns sustain much of the local economy, exposure to these toxins is inevitable with the current practices being employed. The need of the hour is to promote sustainable scrap tyre management systems such as pyrolysis and crumb rubber production.

For more information, please email Salman Zafar on salman@cleantechloops.com or salman@ecomena.org

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